Secondary Source Report-VG

  1. Massey, R. (2004). Environmental Justice: Income, Race, and Health. Global Development And Environment Institute, Tufts University
    • This source explores the relation between health problems and lower-class, minority neighborhoods.
    • In my research project I will be exploring the economic class of Kearny, New Jersey, and answering the question; did class play a role in the placement of this landfill? In the reading “Environmental Justice: Income, Race, and Health”, the author creates a parallel between race and class, and certain health ailments. The author’s research shows an increase in cases of disease and other health problems in poor, minority neighborhoods, and linked this fact to the disproportionate amount of hazardous sites in these neighborhoods. This author’s research will be critical in showing a pattern of hazardous sites being placed in low class, minority neighborhoods.
  2. Collins, J., & David Lewis. (2000). Hydrogen Sulfide: Evaluation of Current California Air Quality Standards With Respect To Protection of Children. California Air Resources Board California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment
    • This source discusses the side effects of exposure to hydrogen sulfide. 
    • The town of Kearny, New Jersey was subject to high hydrogen sulfide emissions that exceeded  NJDEP’s limits. In my research, I will dive into the effects that hydrogen sulfide has on adults and kids alike. In “Hydrogen Sulfide: Evaluation of Current California Air Quality Standards With Respect To Protection of Children”, the authors extensively talk about how hydrogen sulfide is a nuisance to the public. Their research shows the relation between hydrogen sulfide and non-fatal illness amongst children and adults, ranging from different levels of exposure. I will use this research article to demonstrate the side effects of being exposed to hydrogen sulfide. 
  3.  Austin, Regina and Schill, Michael H., “Black, Brown, Poor & Poisoned: Minority Grassroots Environmentalism and the Quest for Eco-Justice” (1991). Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law. 809. https://scholarship.law.upenn.edu/faculty_scholarship/809
    • This source looks into grassroot movements amongst lower-class minorities. 
    • In the reading “Black,, Brown, Poor & Poisoned: Minority Grassroots Environmentalism and the Quest for Eco-Justice, the authors discusses grassroot movements amongst minority groups, and specifically discusses the environmental health issues that grassroot movements tackle. The authors also explores the common misconception of what counts as an environmental issue amongst the minority population. In Kearny, New Jersey, a grassroot movement sparked in the wake of an environmental health issue. This source will be able to give me some parallels to the grassroot movement I will be researching in my project.