Primary Source Report-SC

Sterling Clark

Source 1: Community Update – Soil Cleanup to Begin at the Martin Aaron Incorporated Site

Location: https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/407806.pdf; Part of the official EPA Superfund site registry

Description: This community update contains the most recent information about how the Martin Aaron site has been managed so far and future plans for it. It will give me a small insight of how much information the residents of Camden have received.

Analysis

This document, published on August 1st, 2016, begins by stating that there is still research and evaluation activities being conducted on the site to sharpen their plans for cleanup. Then, the group determined by the borings installed on the site the location and type of contamination, as well as the amount of soil that needs to be removed. The document then gives an idea of the timeline for the removal activities. It concludes by listing some of the requirements for the removal activities and the effects on the surrounding community. The report displays that the local community has enough priority to the EPA that they are at least willing to report progress and plans.

The EPA plays an advisory role in all of these activities but they have been clear in reporting what has happened in this site. For example, the second paragraph shows a schedule that includes beginning the soil removal between Fall 2016 and Winter 2017, and should end after early 2018. This is a rough estimate of a schedule, but it shows that there is some plan in place. “Activities at the Martin Aaron site will result in increased road traffic in the area, and may require road closures.” Statements like this that were made in the third and fourth paragraphs directly address what surrounding civilians should expect and therefore is some assurance that something is in progress. “With oversight by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the Group has installed borings to determine the location and types of soil contamination.” Here they are describing exactly what was done prior to determine their plans for the future.

Source 2: Summary of Historical Ownership and Uses of the Martin Aaron Superfund Site and Select Nearby Properties

Location: https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/113258.pdf; Part of the official EPA Superfund site registry

Description: This is a detailed report of all the various owners, transfers of ownerships, and the many uses of the Martin Aaron site with photos and maps from different times.

Analysis:

This document, written July 19th, 2005, starts with a letter from the attorneys representing Martin Aaron Site PRP Group saying that those who were sent notice letters earlier that year by the EPA formed this group and prepared this report for the EPA’s records. The report gives a brief, two page summary of the site first. It talks about the surrounding area of the site, the different industrial uses dating back to the 1800s, and the other facilities nearby that could have contributed to the pollution of the area. In chronological order, document summarizes every exchange of ownership from 1884 to 1994, detailing what kind of activity went on there. Lastly, a similar timeline is provided for other facilities surrounding the Martin Aaron site. Included are photos and maps of Martin Aaron and the surrounding sites from different periods of time in the second half of the document. Despite seeming like a defense for those who currently own or operate the area, this document perfectly demonstrates how difficult it could’ve been for the communities of Camden to build a campaign against this site because of how many companies were involved and over such a long period of tim

“Before being purchased by Martin Aaron, Inc. in 1968, the property was occupied by companies predominantly engaged in leather tanning operations, leather manufacturing, and wool and hair blending. These operations were active by the 1880s and continued into the 1940s.” This statement and its supporting evidence shows that the contamination likely started long before the the site was owned by Martin Aaron. This complicates an investigation into the primary contributor to the pollution.