Primary Source Report-CN

  1. Master Plan 1964 City of Newark

http://archives.njit.edu/archlib/digital-projects/2000s/2009/plans/njit-naa-2009-0004-p.pdf

This primary source will help aid my research because it will provide me the specific data that I need to prove evidence about how the design of the Ironbound district consequently impacts the development of children through limited access to park, but especially due to the amount of nearby industrial zones.

The main objectives of the city plan were revolved around the industrial economy activity and improving transportation infrastructure, described clearly on page 34 “to stimulate industrial growth through the clearance and redevelopment of obsolete areas, the rehabilitation of marginal industrial areas including provision of loading and parking space, and the elimination of nonindustrial uses from industrial areas where possible, and the provision of industrial land for new industries or for the expansion of existing industries”. While one sentences of the entire objective reading “ Particular emphasis was given to changing neighborhood patterns and their needs for certain community facilities.” Based on the historical context of the time period, Newark was experiencing a decline in their population, due to people migrating to the suburbs, in addition to the migration of industrial companies moving out of urbanized areas to more rural and suburban ones. It is clear how important their goals aligned with keeping people working int the city. With this in mind it understandable why Newark, a city home to an international airport, major ports and extensive railroads, naturally places greater emphasis on the arguably most important sector of its economy. But at what cost? Newark does not have enough land for schools to have the proper amount of green facility space, nor does it supply the right amount parks for the amount of people living in the city. On page 69, the site adequacy for schools is described as “most of Newark’s school sites are significantly below recommended state standards. Ninety per cent of all elementary school sites are less than two acres in size and junior and senior high school sites are also relatively small, ranging from one to five acres.” With regards to the amount of park space and play space, the national standard at this time recommends 6.25 acres per every 1,000 residents, and Newark has determined that they cannot be applied to the city. “The use of a 6.25 acres per 1,000 population would result in approximately 17 per cent of the city’s total land area being devoted to recreation space.” So they have adjusted that number to be 3 acres for every 1,000 residents, half the recommended amount. The plan continues to point out “The most significant deficiency of recreational space ex­ists in the provision of playgrounds and playfields in conjunction with the Newark public schools. Most of the existing schools occupy sites which are much smaller than the minimum standards generally accepted by state school planning authorities.” This shows that Newark has placed greater emphasis on strengthening and further developing the already large industrial sector of the city, instead of providing the residents, and particularly children, with the proper amount of green space. They have made their priorities clear through the master plans.

2. Newark Master Plan (1978)

http://archives.njit.edu/archlib/digital-projects/2000s/2009/plans/njit-naa-2009-0005-p.pdf

This primary source will help aid my research because it will provide me the specific data that I need to prove evidence about how the design of the Ironbound district consequently impacts the development of children through limited access to park, but especially due to the amount of nearby industrial zones.