Final Report-AH

Capped and Filled:
How one New Jersey town closed the last Landfill in the Meadowlands

By Angel Harwood

  Imagine driving down a highway, or a road or even a town, you have the windows down because it is a beautiful day, The breeze is coming through, and you and your family are enjoying the fresh air. Now imagine you are suddenly hit with a smell, like rotten eggs or garbage pile. You try to close your windows fast so the smell will not permeate the car, but it is too late, and the smell is in your vehicle, and your family is complaining about the smell, and you are driving as fast as legally possible to get away from the smell, once you do you finally get to breath fresh air the smell. You go about your trip, glad you do not have to smell that awful odor anymore. For you and your family, this smell lasted only a couple minutes, imagine if you had to experience this smell every day, to walk out your front door and deal with the odor of constant rotten eggs. This is what the residents of Kearny had to deal with every day of their lives.

            The Keegan Landfill that is in Kearny is a 110-acre site that is bordered on the southeast and east by wetlands and open-water wetlands. [1]Frank Creek originates on the site and flows into the Passaic River.  It is believed that the Keegan Landfill opened in the 1940s and collected most of its waste during the 1960s when it was known as the Municipal Sanitary Landfill Authority (MSLA),[2] . Back then, the Landfill could be used with no environmental improvements and no financial assurances.  [3] This is one of the many reasons that the original site of the Landfill was shut down in 1972 because there was no oversite, and the owners of the Landfill didn’t believe it was worth making the improvements to keep the site up and running. The Keegan Landfill was plagued with many problems, from odor complaints to the mishandling of materials that were being placed there to what is it initially used. The Keegan Landfill has been a sore spot and a pain for the Town of Kearny since its inception, and getting it closed was a long-overdue fight.

            To get a better idea what the residents of Kearny were dealing with, we will be exploring these questions, how did they determine when and why the Landfill needed to be operational again? Why would they reopen the Landfill if it was plagued with so many issues when it was open, was it about money or did the think that opening the Landfill would be beneficial to all the parties involved including the residents?  Why did it take the residents protesting and fighting to be heard for the government officials to do something about the Landfill and closed it down, so the Town can get justice for something that they genuinely believe in?

            I will be answering these questions by bringing you through the start of the problems that the town encounter when the Landfill had different owners not taking responsibility for the various issues that they landfill had. Some of the issues were the odor, the trash being piled up, and how the decomposing of this garbage was causing health problems. We are also going to look at the environmental impact it had on the Meadowland and the surrounding Town and why they did not do anything to fix it, but ignore it and the resident’s complaints until they could not anymore.  This problem is one that has plagued Kearny for so long that residents have dealt with it year after year and just accepted it as part of their Town until enough was enough.

 In this paper, we will lay out how the problem started and the original condition of the Landfill. You will be led through what the Landfill has initially been used for and what it was used for before it was closed for good. You will see how the residents of Kearny came together to start the fight to fight for the injustice that was happening and how they struggle to get the proper people to hear them and even Mayor Al Santos is quoted as saying “Our nightmare will come to an end” [4] For the Town to describe something that has been in there for may years as a nightmare will give you some clue about what the Town was going through trying to get Keegan landfill closed.  In the paper, we also explore the health effects that it was starting to cause in the community and did create to get the residents involved in closing the Landfill. One judge even quotes, when they finally, the decision was made that the noxious fumes that were coming from the landfill “represent a clear and immediate danger” to the health of people that live nearby.”[5] You will see how the community came together with its Mayor to close something that affected everyone involved, and these days could be hard to do, but they do it, and they were successful in it.

Video story produced by Angel Harwood.

The Keegan Landfill Problem:

 Since the original part of the Landfill was open and operated and then closed before the State Solid Waste Management Act, they did get away with much mishandling of material and how material that they were allowed to be dump in the Landfill. Since this was the case, they wind up having 65 million gallons of leachate discharged into Frank Creek, which flowed into Newark Bay.[6] This led to discoloring of the Creek water, and they notice of leachate (leachate is the liquid material that comes from the decomposition of garbage) steps along the banks of the Creek and the outside of the Creek. One would wonder if these problems were found after the closing of the original site of the Keegan Landfill and still evident when they commission a site description and design why would they want to use the Landfill again and cause more harm to a community that has already suffer at the hands of the Town that they lived in? One can only imagine that it was because of money or it was previously used as this what else can we do with it.

            One of the reasons the Town did have Camp Dresser and McKee come and analyze the land was because when it was closed in 1972, complaints were starting in the 1980s that small fires were happening at the Landfill. The fires were underground and coming from the barrels that were buried under the topsoil that was dump there when the Landfill was operational. Keegan Landfill was the subject of underground fires several times a year since the site ceased operations.[7] Kearny spent a considerable amount of money covering the large area with soil to stop the underground fires.[8] The majority of these fires happen in the 1980s and continue until they were able to fix the problem in the mid to late 1980s.  Most of the drums that were placed underground at the Landfill were 30 gal drums that came in every morning and put in these big and deep holes. Trucks will come in with sometimes 40 of them and dump them and then leave and repeat the process, most of the chemicals that were in those drums was toxic materials that would cause harm to the waterways that it was connected to and 20 years later can still be found in the water.

            Kearny has had its share of problems since the Landfill was open. While yes, we do logically need a place for our trash to go and it needs to be contained, it does not have to be in an area that was already harming, it does not need to be in a place that was a beautiful open space that was supposed to be a place that people see as a green space or animals and humans to enjoy, but that is what it turns into being. Keegan Landfill is more than a site that is an eyesore; it is a spot that has caused headaches literally and figuratively for a town in Kearny, that residents were tired of fighting and being told to deal with. It is with this that I believed the Town wanted to stop being taken advantage of and show why they needed to put their foot down and fight for what is right.

            To give you a clue to how the Landfill was an eyesore and what the residents saw when they drive passed there let this image speak for itself and how it is broken down and explain: The image that I chose to analyze is one of the actual landfills, and what it looks like today and is the subject for debate. I believe this important because they show one the conditions of the Landfill and all if the different contents of it. It also shows what materials were the cause of the fumes and toxic smells that the residents were experiencing. This Landfill is a powerful image because it shows what was being dumped in the Landfill and how it was being misused.

Keegan Landfill, Kearny, NJ (https://hudsonreporter.com/2019/11/19/sports-authority-blasted-for-appealing-keegan-landfill-closure/

            The first image of the Landfill was taken by a photographer from the Hudson Reporter, one of the newspapers that have been following the closure of this Landfill since the beginning. The image was posted in the press in November of 2019. The image of the Landfill is a powerful one because it shows you that it was not just construction debris being place in the dump, but other materials as well.  When you look at the picture, you will think that it is a regular landfill and just filled with garbage debris and never take a second look at it, but what if I told you this site was supposed to be used for construction debris, such as sheetrock, wood and thinks of that liking and you can see that there is a tire that was thrown away in the Landfill, which is where my eye first went to when I saw the photo. You also can see tons of what looks like clothes or material of all different colors and throughout the Landfill. The colors of the materials are bright and colorful, which brings you to look deeper into the picture, to see what other stuff was placed there. 

             When you start to look deeper, you see sheetrock that is in different stages of decay and building materials such as insulation, bricks, dirt, just piled on top of each other. You can see the content was taken from the different construction sites and just dump without any care. I believe the attended audience is the public. The reason this is to produce a sense of shock and awe that it was happening in their backyard. The people that are not familiar with the site or the Town can see the damage of what was happening, how it was happening, and why the residents of this Town were standing up and making the NJSEA and the leaders of their Town take notice and do something about it.

            When you look at the photograph, you do not take it all in; you have to take it in by bits and pieces to realize the type of junk and trash that is being dumped in the Landfill. A landfill that was attended for construction materials and waste. There is more in this Landfill then sheetrock, brick, and wood, which supports the residents of Kearny complaints about illegal dumping and liquid material leaking out of the Landfill. This is what led to the noxious odor coming from the Landfill and affecting the air that the people were breathing and causing health concerns. The picture speaks volumes of what is in the Landfill and what is happening at the site. It is a colorful image if why the Town of Kearny wanted the Landfill close and filled and replace with something that matters.

 Now you might be asking yourself why it is essential to understand and why do I need to know this information and does it have anything to do with the current Landfill that the Town of Kearny fought to get closed in 2019, and the answer is yes, and it is necessary and connects to the modern-day story. Camp Dresser and McKee were on this site to see how the Town of Kearny can build another landfill on top of the current one and what they would have to do to make it. The Town wanted to create another landfill on top of an existing landfill, why because it would save the Town 20 million dollars a year that they didn’t have to ship their waste out to other county or even state if they had a facility there and they could take trash from other towns as well.

            Their goal was to fix the problems with the old Landfill and contain and control the existing pollutants from the site while providing a much-needed non-processible material for the region. [9] In the end, it is all about the bottom line and what they can hope to achieve by what is essentially a “money pit.”  They want to repair what was broken and to make it profitable so that it can do less harm then it was already doing, even if it meant that they had to make it into another landfill. Fixing the existing Landfill and making it into a new one was not going to be an easy task and not one that looked onto as a good thing and because they wanted to make sure that they were doing it the right way and for the right reason whether or not that was their main intentions, it started that way.  

This report is vital to the Kearny residents because it gives a background to the issues the Landfill was having.  When Camp Dresser and McKee did the site description to show how the Landfill could be made operational and do no environmental harm, it proposed that it be built differently. They wanted to make sure not only the waste from the previous site was correctly buried and would not cause any more landfill fires, but they also wanted to make sure that it was in regulations and would not do any more harm to the community than it already did. They wanted to make sure that the wall that they built would include a perimeter soil-bentonite cutoff wall that will hydraulically isolate the Landfill from the marsh.[10] They also wanted to build a pump that would be allowed the leachate flow to go to the Kearny Pump Station and then to the PVSC Wastewater treatment plant. [11] It will allow all decomposed debris to be put in one general area and not do more harm then what it was doing already.

            The report was from twenty-five years ago, it had all these things to that needed to be put in place to make sure not only that there would not be any more underground fires but that there would not be leakage into the waterways that surrounded Kearny, that traffic in and out of the Landfill would be monitor and that the odor that comes from the Landfill would not do harm to the city of Kearny. If twenty-five years ago these things were recommended and were implicated, why is the resident of Kearny trying to close a landfill that is having the same issues that it was having twenty years ago? Did someone drop the ball on making sure the Landfill was compliant or did the land that it was built on deciding enough was enough? In this next section, we will talk about how it started to affect the Town and the next steps that were taken by the Town to make that they landfill closed for good, and their children did not have to fight that they were now fighting.

             The residents of Kearny had to make sure that the Landfill was closed because the protections that were put in place were not being enforced. It had a history of not following the rules and doing things that need to be done to protect the people of Kearny, why would this time be any different and how could they make sure that their children did not have to fight this fight that they are fighting? How could they not only protect their children but their Town? The residents must come together to fight for what they believed is right and do what needs to be done.  I created this video to give you a glimpse into the fight that Kearny had to endure and the struggle that they went through to make sure that the Landfill was closed and that they would not be ignored and that they would be heard no matter the cost. https://youtu.be/LJuSv5xw-jUard.

 Kearny Residents Fight Back:

            When the Landfill was reopening in New Jersey in 2009, it was open to cap and closed the Landfill with construction and demolition debris. [12] When the state reopened the Landfill, they were promised that landfills would be turned over to the Town of Kearny for the construction of a golf course and recreational fields. [13] When 2016 came, and the state refused to turn the Landfill to the Town, and they did this by using the power of eminent domain to take the legal title and continue landfilling operations. [14] That is when the resident has enough and knew that they had to stand up for what was right and fight for their Town.

            The Kearny residents have been protesting and putting in complaints about the odor coming from the Landfill for over a year, but the protest that happens In April 2019, is the one that got the attention of the newspaper and was reported on. The residents made sure that they were able to call newspaper reporters and that the Mayor would be in attendance. At the protest, there were 300 residents of Kearny; they held signs and vests and masks and marched down Bergen Ave to the front of the main landfill entrance. [15] They wanted to bring attention to the what was happening at the Landfill and make sure that the Governor knew that they wished to action and was not going to take no for an answer and that this was important to the residents and the Mayor because he wanted to do what was essential to his Town and for the health of all.

            The Mayor’s voice was the most vocal at the protest rally he led the residents in chants asking Governor Murphy to shut down the Landfill. He wanted to make sure that they knew the New Jersey had a history of misrepresentation, and he was not going to stand for it. [16] Mayor Santos was quoted as saying, “The State of New Jersey continues to fiddle while serious health impacts from hydrogen sulfide had been found in the Kearny Landfill. Because the state is the owner and operator of the Landfill, they must take immediate action to close it and properly clean up the site with a gas collection system and am impermeable cape over the entire surface to eliminate the odor coming from the site.”[17] The residents wanted to make sure that it was known that the issues that were caused by the site were important enough for them to come together and stop it and that it needed to stop because of the harm that it is responsible for.

            The residents continue the battle by doing a protest in front of the Landfill and the Governor’s office and by filing complaints with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). When they were not heard, and they felt like their claims were falling on death ears, they took it to the courts. The go the Kearny officials and the New Jersey Sierra Club which was known for helping with environmental issues and getting the word out there and making sure they were knocking on the right doors. They had reporters write a news article on it had news12 reports on their protest rallies and everything that could to show that the Landfill was causing harm to the residents of Kearny.

            Then on June 12, 2019, they finally got the ruling that that wanted a judge rules that the Landfill should be closed. The judge ruled that the Keegan Landfill should be closed because it was causing “irreparable harm” if it would stay open, thus the decision should stay in place until July when a permanent decision should be made. [18] It was the first sign that all their hard work was paying off and that they were moving in the right direction. Even after the ruling, the NJSEA still did not want to take responsibility for the harm that the Landfill was causing; instead, they accused Mayor Santos as being responsible for its current state. [19] The NJSEA had

Initially denied that it was the source of the hydrogen sulfate odor but to concede that it was when high levels of it were detected by an air quality member installed by the Town of Kearny in its adjacent Department of Public Works garage. [20] They still were not taking responsibility and felt like they were being punished, and no wrongdoing was done.

            Since they felt like it was not their problem, they tried to make it harder for the Town to close the Landfill and point blame on the NJSEA. The NJSEA files a lawsuit and an injunct so that the Landfill cannot be closed, and they can continue to operate the Landfill. When they did the newspapers and residents did not take it lying down, they wanted to make sure that the reason the Landfill was closing was valid and that there was no wrongdoing on their part. The director of NJSEA Marturano saw it as a nuisance. He did believe that there was any justification for the problem and that “We see it as a nuisance-odor complaint,” Marturano said. “It’s not a health crisis.” [21] It did not stop the citizen. It fired them and made them realize that they had to fight harder. They had to make sure that what he was saying was not right. It made Senator Nicholas Sacco make a resolution that called the NJSEA and other state agencies to permanently close and cap the Keegan landfill with an impermeable cap. [22]  It was an action that had to be done so that the Governor did not have to sign off. This action took a lot of the pressure off the Governor and put it on the judges and the court system and not in his hands.

            Throughout the lawsuit between the Town of Kearny and the NJSEA went on for months before it was decided, the judges were the ones that had to choose to close the Landfill and when it was closed. They made their cases it and it was up to them. The had to wait, and while they wait, they were putting pressure on the NJSEA to do the right thing, closing the Landfill and making it a place that can be enjoyed and not a place that would be feared.

Victory for Kearny:

            In December of 2019, the final decision was made, and the Keegan Landfill was going to be permanently closed. It was a deal made with the Governor and the NJSEA. All the townships worked paid off, and then they got the result that they wanted. Governor Murphy was quote on twitter and in a newspaper as saying, “Together NJSEA and Kearny will create a plan to close and cap the landfill in a responsible way and create future recreational access to the Kearny Marsh.” [23] It was something that everyone wanted, and it was the end of a battle that was hard-fought.  While it was a deal that should have went through when all parties saw the harmful health effects it was having on the community.

            The two excellent outcomes that came from this battle is that the Landfill will be capped the proper way, the way that it should have been done years ago. The Landfill is going to be closed and turned into something that is going to beautiful everybody involved without harming the environment. While it will take two years to cap the entire Landfill the proper way, so that there will be no leakage of noxious odors and no underground fires, it will all be worth it. It will show that when you believe in something and fight for it, the outcome is worth the fight.

Conclusion:

            The residents of Kearny knew what they wanted to achieve, and they wanted justice for the injustice that they face. The fight to close Keegan Landfill started long before now, and it took the dedication, and the will power of a town to make sure they were not only heard but were able to fight for what they believed was right. The success that they achieve is rare; to get a community to come together and come down on the right side is hard to come by. The Kearny community knew Keegan Landfill needed to be closed and the residents made sure it was done. With all things, there is always going to be two sides of a story, and one party that feels like that they were unjustly charged with something, in the end, the State of New Jersey did something right for it citizen and took responsibility for something wrong. Mayor Santos was quoted as saying, “There is no amount of money that compensates for harm to our health or our environment.  We want this closed by the Governor, and we want offending parties held accountable, even if they are an agency of the State of New Jersey.” [24] In the end, that is what happens, they took responsibility for what happens and the harm that it caused.

Key words: pollution, water, class, toxics, factories

Endnotes:

[1] U.S. Army Corps of Engineer, Meadowlands Environmental Site Investigation Compilation (MESIC) (Chapter on Keegan Landfill) April 15, 1999, March 31,2020 https://meri.njmeadowlands.gov/mesic/sites/existingpotential-remediation-sites/keegan-landfill-2/

[2] Meadowlands Environmental Site Investigation Compilation (MESIC) (Chapter on Keegan Landfill) April 15, 1999, March 31,2020 https://meri.njmeadowlands.gov/mesic/sites/existingpotential-remediation-sites/keegan-landfill-2/

[3] Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission, Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill 6/6/1995, pg. 37 https://www.nj.gov/dep/passaicdocs/docs/3rd-PartyComplaintNexusPackages/3rd-PartyComplaintDNexus/Keegan1BLandfillSite-WasteMgt.pdf

[4] Fallon, Scott, “Keegan Landfill, last in the Meadowlands, to be permanently closed under deal with Murphy” northjersey.com 12/20/2019, https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/environment/2019/12/20/keegan-landfill-kearny-capped-and-closed-under-deal/2707875001/

[5] Fallon, Scott, “Keegan Landfill, last in the Meadowlands, to be permanently closed under deal with Murphy” northjersey.com 12/20/2019, https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/environment/2019/12/20/keegan-landfill-kearny-capped-and-closed-under-deal/2707875001/

[6]  Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission, Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill 6/6/1995, pg. 37 https://www.nj.gov/dep/passaicdocs/docs/3rd-PartyComplaintNexusPackages/3rd-PartyComplaintDNexus/Keegan1BLandfillSite-WasteMgt.pdf

[7]  Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission, Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill 6/6/1995, pg. 40 https://www.nj.gov/dep/passaicdocs/docs/3rd-PartyComplaintNexusPackages/3rd-PartyComplaintDNexus/Keegan1BLandfillSite-WasteMgt.pdf

[8]Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission, Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill 6/6/1995, https://www.nj.gov/dep/passaicdocs/docs/3rd-PartyComplaintNexusPackages/3rd-PartyComplaintDNexus/Keegan1BLandfillSite-WasteMgt.pdf pg.40

[9] Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission, Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill 6/6/1995, pg. 41 https://www.nj.gov/dep/passaicdocs/docs/3rd-PartyComplaintNexusPackages/3rd-PartyComplaintDNexus/Keegan1BLandfillSite-WasteMgt.pdf

[10]Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission, Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill 6/6/1995, pg. 42 https://www.nj.gov/dep/passaicdocs/docs/3rd-PartyComplaintNexusPackages/3rd-PartyComplaintDNexus/Keegan1BLandfillSite-WasteMgt.pdf

[11]Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission, Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill 6/6/1995, pg. 42 https://www.nj.gov/dep/passaicdocs/docs/3rd-PartyComplaintNexusPackages/3rd-PartyComplaintDNexus/Keegan1BLandfillSite-WasteMgt.pdf

[12] Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019 https://www.kearnynj.org/news/statement-by-kearny-mayor-alberto-g-santos-on-the-njsea-keegan-landfill-protest/,

[13]  Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019 https://www.kearnynj.org/news/statement-by-kearny-mayor-alberto-g-santos-on-the-njsea-keegan-landfill-protest/, 

[14]Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019 https://www.kearnynj.org/news/statement-by-kearny-mayor-alberto-g-santos-on-the-njsea-keegan-landfill-protest/, 

[15] Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019 https://www.kearnynj.org/news/statement-by-kearny-mayor-alberto-g-santos-on-the-njsea-keegan-landfill-prot Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019

[16]  Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019 https://www.kearnynj.org/news/statement-by-kearny-mayor-alberto-g-santos-on-the-njsea-keegan-landfill-protest/,est/,   

[17] Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019 https://www.kearnynj.org/news/statement-by-kearny-mayor-alberto-g-santos-on-the-njsea-keegan-landfill-protest/,est/,

[18] “NJ Supreme Court Closes Keegan Landfill” closekeegan.com 06/13/2019 https://closekeegan.com/f/nj-supreme-court-closes-keegan-landfill

[19] https://closekeegan.com/f/nj-supreme-court-closes-keegan-landfill “NJ Supreme Court Closes Keegan Landfill”, closekegan.com 6/13/2019

https://closekeegan.com/f/nj-supreme-court-closes-keegan-landfill%5B20%5D “NJ Supreme Court Closes Keegan Landfill”, closekeegan.com 6/13/2019,

[21] Canessa, Kevin, “Marturano: There’s no health crisis caused by the Keegan”, theobserver.com 09/2019 https://www.theobserver.com/2019/09/marturano-theres-no-health-crisis-caused-by-the-keegan/

[22]  Canessa, Kevin, “Marturano: There’s no health crisis caused by the Keegan”, theobserver.com 09/2019 https://www.theobserver.com/2019/09/marturano-theres-no-health-crisis-caused-by-the-keegan/

[23]  Fallon, Scott, “Keegan Landfill, last in the Meadowlands, to be permanently closed under deal with Murphy” northjersey.com 12/20/2019, https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/environment/2019/12/20/keegan-landfill-kearny-capped-and-closed-under-deal/2707875001/  

[24] Kearny Holds Protest Demanding the Closure of the Keegan Landfill, Kearnynj.com 04/27/2019 https://www.kearnynj.org/news/statement-by-kearny-mayor-alberto-g-santos-on-the-njsea-keegan-landfill-protest/,est/, 

Works Cited:

      12, Waste360 Staff | Mar. “New Jersey Officials Agree to Cap Keegan Landfill.” Waste360, March 12, 2020. https://www.waste360.com/closure/new-jersey-officials-agree-cap-keegan-landfill.

Canessa, Kevin, “Gov. Murphy: Close the Keegan Landfill Now.” The Observer Online, April 5, 2019. https://www.theobserver.com/2019/02/gov-murphy-close-the-keegan-landfill-now/.

Heinis, John. “NJSEA Passes Resolution to Permanently Close Kearny’s Keegan Landfill.” Hudson County View, December 20, 2019. https://hudsoncountyview.com/njsea-passes-resolution-to-permanently-close-kearnys-keegan-landfill/.

Fallon, Scott. “Keegan Landfill. Last in the Meadowlands, to be permanently closed under deal with Murphy, December 20, 2019, https://northjersey.com/story/news/environment/2019/12/20/keegan-landfill-kearny-capped-and-closed-under-deal/.

“Home.” Town of Kearny, April 22, 2019. https://www.kearnynj.org/.

“Keegan Landfill.” MESIC Report Keegan Landfill Comments. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://meri.njmeadowlands.gov/mesic/sites/existingpotential-remediation-sites/keegan-landfill-2/.

“Keegan Landfill.” Town of Kearny, March 6, 2020. https://www.kearnynj.org/keegan-landfill/.

“Keegan Landfill: Kearny, NJ.” Wastebits. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://wastebits.com/locator/location/keegan-landfill.

Landfill, Close the Keegan. “Close Keegan Landfill.” Environmental Health Disaster. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://closekeegan.com/.

Montemarano, Mike, “Sports Authority Blasted for Appealing Keegan Landfill Closure.” Hudson Reporter, November 19, 2019. https://hudsonreporter.com/2019/11/19/sports-authority-blasted-for-appealing-keegan-landfill-closure/.

“New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority.” New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority. Accessed April 3, 2020. http://www.njsea.com/.

West, Teri, Patrick Villanova, Jersey Journal, and Jersey Journal. “Judge: Keegan Landfill in Kearny Must Close Permanently.” NJ, September 30, 2019. https://www.nj.com/hudson/2019/09/judge-keegan-landfill-in-kearny-must-close-permanently.html.

West, Teri, Patrick Villanova, Jersey Journal, and Jersey Journal. “Judge: Keegan Landfill in Kearny Must Close Permanently.” NJ, September 30, 2019. https://www.nj.com/hudson/2019/09/judge-keegan-landfill-in-kearny-must-close-permanently.html.

“Preliminary Environmental and Health Impact Statement for the Materials Handling Complex at the Former Keegan Landfill,” a report for the Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission undertaken by the engineering firm Camp Dresser and McKee, June 1995 pgs. 32-60.  www. Keeganlandfill.com